Botanical Breast Enhancement: Guide

Mint

Picture of mint

This is about mint, including its hormonal properties and use for breast enhancement.

Etymology

The genus of Mint goes by the scientific name of Mentha. The scientific name of peppermint is Mentha piperita. Spearmint's scientific name is Mentha spicata. Mentha suaveolens is the proper name for pineapple mint. Mentha arvensis has the common names of wild mint, field mint and cornmint.

Mint belongs to the Lamiaceae family, and this family also goes by Labiatae or the mint family.

Hormonal properties

Spearmint is often suggested to have estrogenic properties, however, it appears to have androgenic attributes. A review noted that spearmint tea increased luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels, but it claimed that mint had neglible effect on total androgen levels. According to a study by Celik et al., peppermint is an aromatase inhibitor. A rise of LH levels subsequently raises androgens. Mint can raise estrogen levels likely due to its FSH raising ability. Peppermint was not as throughly investigated as spearmint, but it contains many of the same properties.

Mentha arvensis (cornmint) has lowered the mineralcorticoid corticosterone in rats.

Phytohormones of interest

Spearmint (Mentha spicata) contains anethole, and the lignan cyclolariciresinol.

Peppermint contains the phytohormone anisoles: estragole and anethole (trans-anethole).

Anectodal evidence

Based on anectodal evidence, mint appears to have androgenic properties. In small doses, spearmint increases estrogenic signs on the body. However, in larger doses, mint causes acne, increased menstrual heaviness, and hirsuitism symptoms. This suggests that in small doses, androgenic properties of mint sensitize aromatase conversion. This estrogenic response becomes limited with higher doses of mint.

Spearmint seems to contain an ERα antagonist. The ERα antagonist could be due to lignans, and it is less likely to be anisoles.

Use

Mentha for breast enhancement

Picture of mint

Spearmint use should be limited to minimal amounts, at times to only once per phase. Spearmint has caused bust enhancement during premenstrual, but its use here is not sustainable. During menses, it can only be used once at the beginning. Spearmint is prefered over peppermint, as peppermint's effects on menses are stronger.

For more lasting and balanced effects, see the herb programs or the ebook for the full herbal combination.

Herb timing and combinations' success for breast enhancement relies on menstrual phases.

Descriptions of results from combination herb use, potentially Mentha or herbs with similar properties, can be seen in the program blogs of: anon03, anon05, Canadian Belle, hirsutism01 and hirsutism02.

Similar herbs

Basil (Ocimum) contains anisoles, which spearmint and peppermint also have. Basil is also an emmanogogue, which seems to be stronger than mints. Basil is not recommended: it seems too strong, and it is less suitable than peppermint or spearmint.

It hasn't been investigated if sesame seed is a replacement for spearmint. Sesame seed also contains the lignan cyclolariciresinol, which many other seeds and herbs don't have. Sesame seed is one of the highest known sources of lignans.

Precautions

Concentrates of mint are easily toxic in amounts comparable to a teaspoon.

There are questions about herbs that contain anisoles: anethole, estragole or their derivatives about their roles in cancer. Herbs containing anisoles that are commonly used in food are not a major concern.

See precautions for more details of care to be taken with herb use. Proper nutrition is a consideration for health. Also, check for the latest blog updates about herb and hormone safety.

It is very important that menses be light and not prolonged.

If you have hirsutism, PCOS, hot-flashes, other signs of hormone imbalances, see estrogen-imbalance, and hirsutism program journals #1 and #2 before trying herbs.

Herb concentrates can be tens of times more potent by weight than herbs in solid form. This can easily lead to hormone imbalances. For this reason, concentrate extracts are not recommended for extended or excessive internal use, especially during fertility years. Concentrates shouldn't be used to overcome plateaus. Another issue with herbal extracts, is that they may not have the full range of properties of the herb. Essential oils are not recommended for breast enhancement. If opting to use herb extracts, use no more than 1 drop at a time diluted in a food-grade carrier oil (like unrefined olive oil), or water.

More

anon02's breast enhancement results from 2017 until 2018
Anon02

Pictures of breast enhancement can be seen at the past program blogs of Bubblemelon and anon02.

breast-endocrinology.pdf describes the science of breast development and endocrinology. It also describes symptoms related to hormone imbalances. Biology and hormone imbalances are excerpts from this ebook. breast-endocrinology.pdf uses a Creative Commons (CC BY-ND 4.0) license.

super-bazongas.pdf is the 2nd volume that is a breast enhancement guide. It continues with a theory of herb use for breast development, and the application for herb use. This volume is free for personal and fair use.

For resources on hips and butt enhancement, see: /appendix/hips-butt-enhancement and /appendix/kettlebell.


Breast enhancement; health blog

Blog updates: breast topics and health related content.

Hirsutism02 - February 03, 2020
In the first two weeks, her hair conditions improved noticeably: body hair lowered, and scalp hair improved. There were also minor gains in breast size.

Jellie - January 13, 2020
The evening before, she took a tea of 3,000mg fennel, 1,500mg sunflower, and about 50mg each of spearmint and fenugreek. Measurements for bust and hips are both 37¼". Underbust to nipple is about 3¾" Ovulation is perhaps about to occur. Phytohormone break down likely influenced ovulation.

Hops - February 09, 2020
Investigating replacements for hops Looking into valerian and passionfruit as partial replacements for hops. They have similar properties based on mood. It is underinvestigated if their effects on GABA and mood has to do with an influence on prolactin. There is not enough information on the prenylflavonoid content on passionfruit, and the flavonoid content in valerian. There is a similarity in valerian that it can cause skin sensitivity, like hops. Valerian and passionfruit should likely be avoided during proliferative phase, like hops. Beets and figs are other plants to investigate. There isn't enough information available on the phytohormone content of beets. Certain figs have hormonal properties for being used for galactagogues and preventing miscarriages. There are also anti-inflamatory properties of figs. Figs contain lignans, and flavonoids which need to be further investigated. The type of prenylflavonoid matters, in what the receptors it will target and the effect. Milkthistle is a partial substitute for hops, but it's effects are mainly on ERβ. Sunflower seed and wheat bread seemed to cause a minor improvement from allergic-like symptoms. Sunflower did improve hormone balance slightly.

Anethole & estragole - June 25, 2019
Many known stilbenes are estrogen receptor antagonists. Stilbenes and their polymers include: anethole, dianethole, estragole, tamoxifen, stilbene and stilbestrol. Spearmint and fennel contain stilbenes as active hormonal constituents. Based on anecdotal information from spearmint's and fennel's actions, anethole, dianethole and estragole are likely ERα selective. Anethole is another name for transanethole, and Stilbene is another term for transtilbene. Estragole and anethole are isomers. Dianethole and photoanethole are polymers of anethole.

Breast Development and Endocrinology, 3rd Ed - May 22, 2019
Expanded and clarified details for Breast Development and Endocrinology 3rd edition. From now on, this will be volume 1. These edits will reflect in Super Bazongas. Herb schedule will be edited, but same herb combinations will be used as basis. Future releases of Super Bazongas will be volume 2.

Super Bazongas: Note - October 05, 2019
Super Bazongas, Vol 2, is not up to date, and is currently available for archive purposes. It will be updated at a later time. See program blogs for more recent information.

2019 archive - June 04, 2019

2018 archive - December 31, 2018

2017 archive - December 31, 2017

2016 archive - December 31, 2016

References:

Etymology & Definitions: